Welcome

GOAL: to help you reclaim eating moments of your life with meaning and moderation; to help you leverage self-acceptance and compassion; to help you appreciate the ordinary perfection of what is; and to help you rediscover your essential self. 

Pavel Somov, Ph.D.

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10 Clinical Skills to Overcome Overeating

Author: Pavel Somov, Ph.D.
Publisher: CMI Education Institute 2011
Length: 4 DVD(s)
Media Type: Seminar on DVD
Duration: 5 hours, 29 minutes
Item: ZNV041660

 

Price : $79.99

Product Details

There is more to mindful/conscious eating than just slowing down, paying attention and chewing ten times.

Watch this seminar recording and take home a highly experiential, clinically eclectic mix of conscious eating skills designed to broaden the definition of mindful eating beyond the “raisin meditation.”

The recording will culminate with motivational enhancement training through a development of a personalized philosophy of eating designed to help your client (and you!) anchor your eating habits in your existential and life values.

This practical and popular seminar recording is based on Pavel Somov’s program of awareness-building and habit-modifying mindful practices to overcome overeating one meal at a time described in his book, Eating the Moment.

Thursday
Jul092009

3 Principles of Mindful Emotional Eating

You have two options in regard to emotional eating: you can try to eliminate it altogether or you can try to make better use of it by making emotional eating more conscious. The latter would be consistent with the goals of harm reduction, a humanistic form of psychotherapy that offers a pragmatic risk-reduction approach to managing problematic behaviors.

Three Principles of Mindful Emotional Eating

If becoming a mindful emotional eater is the goal you'd like to pursue, the following three principles will help you transition from mindlessly-reactive emotional eating to mindfully-conscious emotional eating in moderation:

1) when eating to cope with emotions, accept emotional eating as a legitimate coping choice, not a coping failure;

2) when eating to cope with emotions, follow a predictable eating ritual, with clear start and end points;

3) when eating to cope with emotions, remember that emotional eating does not have to mean emotional overeating.

Following these guidelines will help you approach emotional eating with a sense of control.

Ritualize Emotional Eating

Habits, routines and rituals offer a soothing, stabilizing sense of predictability and help us feel in control of the moment. Emotional eating episodes are often haphazard and unstructured. To help you rely less on food and more on the activity of eating during your emotional eating episode, I encourage you to ritualize and structure your emotional eating "protocol."

I encourage to always begin by stating to yourself (out loud or internally) that you are making a conscious choice to cope by eating and that in doing so, you are giving yourself a permission to not feel guilty or disgusted with yourself afterwards since emotional eating is, however imperfect, a viable form of self-care. Decide in advance not to judge yourself.

Following this statement of intent and the permission to cope by eating, identify how you feel and what you are trying to cope with. You might follow this by stating your expectations of how you wish to feel after you eat. Then, consciously consider what you will eat and decide on a "dose." Then, with mindfulness of the process, eat.

Take your time to savor and appreciate the flavor of the food as well as the subtle changes in your state of mind and body. Pause to check to if you have attained a desired emotional state; if not, proceed with another serving and check again. When you feel you have attained a desired state (whether you use psychological or somatic/physiological markers for that), allow yourself a realization that you have once again been able to successfully self-soothe with food.

Congratulate yourself on another coping success.

Pavel Somov, Ph.D, author of Eating the Moment: 141 Mindful Practices to Overcome Overeating One Meal at a Time (New Harbinger, 2008)